Food Safety Magazine

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Solutions for Challenges in Extraction and Quantitation of Arsenic in Food

Tuesday, July 18 at 2pm Eastern

Along with rice and apple juice, seafood and seaweed are major sources of human exposure to dietary arsenic. Although toxic inorganic chemical forms of arsenic such as arsenate or arsenite are well understood, the safety and toxicity of arsenosugars and lipid-soluble arsenicals are still under debate. The literature is limited in terms of the methods and sample groups used for such analyses, but the range and variation of arsenic in each species affect its characterization and quantitation.

Attend this webinar to hear Dr. Mesay Wolle, Research Fellow at the US FDA/CFSAN, discuss the origins of arsenic in seafood. He will also explain why arsenic is not always harmful to human health and provide expertise on sample preparation and chromatographic methods needed to accurately analyze arsenic speciation in seafood. The discussion will include a topical overview of new methodology developed recently at the FDA/CFSAN, for extracting, separating and quantifying arsenic in finfish, crustaceans, mollusks and seaweed. Following D
r. Wolle's presentation, Michael Murphy, Technical Director at Metrohm USA, will present commonly used ion chromatography solutions that help ensure the safety of foods.

Topics Include:

•    The origins of arsenic in seafood

•    New methodology developed recently at FDA/CFSAN for extracting, separating and quantifying arsenic in finfish, crustaceans, mollusks and seaweed

•    Commonly used ion chromatography solutions that help ensure food safety

Speakers:

Dr. Mesay Wolle is a research Fellow at the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, in College Park, Maryland. As an accomplished analytical chemist with years of research, he is experienced in the use of several analytical techniques including mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, LC-MS/MS), atomic spectrometry (ICP-OES), and chromatography. His expertise spans the areas of elemental and molecular speciation analysis, isotope dilution mass spectrometry, wastewater management, and pesticide residue analysis. Dr. Wolle's background includes tenures at Duquesne University as a Research Associate and as an adjunct Research Scientist at Applied Isotope Technologies, both in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He holds a PhD in Analytical and Environmental Chemistry from the University of Oslo, Norway, and a Masters in Analytical Chemistry from Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia.

?Michael Murphy is the Technical Director at Metrohm USA overseeing Laboratory and Training operations. Michael joined Metrohm USA in 2014 as the Technical Support Manager and quickly assumed additional responsibilities leading in-house service repair operations and production of process instrumentation. Prior to joining Metrohm USA, Michael worked as a National Service Manager, Product Manager, Compliance Manager, Training Supervisor and Technical Instructor for Thermo Fisher Scientific. Michael earned his B.A. in Chemistry from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Georgia in Athens. Following his graduate work, Michael was a visiting scientist at the Counterterrorism and Forensic Science Research Unit of the FBI where he focused on the analysis of forensic samples of interest using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy.

Moderated by: Barbara Van Renterghem, Editorial Director, Food Safety Magazine

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Simultaneous Determination of 24 Veterinary Drugs by UPLC-MS/MS

Thursday, April 6 at 2pm Eastern

A UPLC-MS/MS-based method was developed and validated for the simultaneous confirmation and quantification of 24 analytes of quinolones, including fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides and tetracyclines and its epimers following the European Union’s (EU) performance criteria (CD 2002/657/EC). Samples were extracted using a simple method by acidified acetonitrile (0.5 mL of 0.1% formic acid in 7 mL acetonitrile) with a clean-up step using n-hexane and methanol, followed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The method validation and proficiency testing provided evidence that the method is suitable for the detection and quantification of 24 antibiotic residues in routine analysis of fish and fishery products.

Topics Include:
•    Single method for the analysis of multiple classes of veterinary drugs in aquaculture
•    Method development and validation in accordance with EU Commission Decision 2002/657/EC
•    Application of this efficient method to real samples of fish and fishery products for routine surveillance and export

Speakers:

Dr. Anoop A. Krishnan currently oversees the Export Inspection Agency-Kolkata Laboratory. He has 15 years of experience in residue and contaminant analysis. He received a Ph.D. in Biosciences from Mangalore University, Karnataka, in 2009.  He is a member of the Codex delegation on methods of analysis and sampling, and is a trained and qualified assessor per ISO/IEC 17025:2005 and ISO 34:2009.

Moderated by: Barbara Van Renterghem, Editorial Director, Food Safety Magazine

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Preventing Unnecessary Recalls with Accurate Sampling and Proper Sample Preparation


A decision to recall or stop sales of a food product or raw ingredient has severe financial implications. Product quarantine in the food industry is necessary to protect public health and can be triggered by the result of a single analysis. Proper sampling and sample preparation procedures are the only way to ensure this data point accurately represents the product in question.

Attend this webinar to hear Nancy Thiex, industry consultant and FDA-recognized expert on sampling, explain how to systematically develop sampling protocols for defensible decisions in your operation. Good sample integrity in the laboratory requires unique sample preparation and precise analysis techniques. Learn from Lori Carey, Titration Product Manager at Metrohm USA, the importance of integrated sample preparation to achieve accurate titration results.

Key learning objectives:
•    Understand sources and consequences of sampling errors in the food and ingredient industry
•    Understand how proper sampling and sample preparation affect quality control
•    Learn how sample preparation can be integrated into titration food analyzers for improved accuracy

Speakers:

Nancy Thiex is an industry consultant and FDA recognized expert on sampling with 35 years experience in analytical services including 33 years in laboratory management at South Dakota State University, Olson Agricultural Analytical Services Laboratory. Over the years, she has gained experience in almost every aspect of laboratory management.


Lori Carey is the product manager for titration for Metrohm USA. She has a Bachelor's degree in chemistry from St. Joseph's College in Indiana and over 10 years of experience in the chemical, food & beverage, and environmental industries. During her prior 3 years as an applications chemist at Metrohm USA, she focused on the development of thermometric titration and has successfully brought innovative solutions to difficult applications in a variety of industries.

Moderated by: Barbara Van Renterghem, Editorial Director, Food Safety Magazine

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Simple Solutions for Consistent Quality Measurements


Consistent quality control measurements are key to high-quality food products, but variability in operator technique limits consistent results. Even though manual titrations are used throughout the food industry for fast quality checks of everything from raw ingredients to final packaged products, subjective endpoint detection limits the consistency of these measurements. This challenge makes it nearly impossible for two operators to record the same endpoint and deliver consistent results. Fortunately, there is a simple solution.

Dr. David Cunningham, senior principle scientist at Ocean Spray Cranberries, will share his improvements gained from automatic titration during his 30+ years of food industry experience. David drove improvements in product quality and productivity as he led an organizational change from manual to automatic titration in both research and production. As the principle lead for Ocean Spray’s technical support and training, David will also discuss the necessity of integrating a simple, easy-to-train automatic titration system.

Key learning objectives:

  • Understand how inconsistent measurements from manual titration negatively affect product quality
  • See how automatic titration overcomes the limitations of manual titrations while maintaining easy-to-use and easy-to-learn methods
  • Learn the productivity and accuracy benefits that come from using automatic titration in any quality control setting

Speakers:

David Cunningham, Ph.D., is senior principal scientist in the research sciences and regulatory affairs group of Ocean Spray Cranberries, where he has worked for 31 years. He currently leads efforts in technical and regulatory risk management, provides subject matter expertise in the cranberry, analytical and quality sciences, and supports the technical issue resolution and training needs of the business. Dr. Cunningham led Ocean Spray’s transition from the use of manual titration techniques for juice acidity and vitamin C determinations to the use of automatic titration equipment in their corporate and plant laboratories. Previously, Dr. Cunningham held a fellowship position with the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in Washington, DC. Dr. Cunningham received his Ph.D. in food chemistry, with an emphasis on flavor and natural products chemistry, from Cornell University and his B.S. in chemistry from the State University of New York at Albany.

Dr. Cunningham is currently a member of the American Chemical Society, the Institute of Food Technologists, AOAC International, the Technical Committee on Juice and Juice Products, the Juice Products Association Technical Affairs and Food Chemistry Committees, and the Grocery Manufacturers Association’s Food Industry Analytical Chemist Working Group.

Lori Carey is the product manager for titration for Metrohm USA. She has a Bachelor’s degree in chemistry from St. Joseph’s College in Indiana and over 10 years of experience in the chemical, food & beverage, and environmental industries. During her prior 3 years as an applications chemist at Metrohm USA, she focused on the development of thermometric titration and has successfully brought innovative solutions to difficult applications in a variety of industries.


Moderated by: Barbara Van Renterghem, Editorial Director, Food Safety Magazine

Sponsored by:




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